COVID-19 in Oklahoma: New cases, deaths, vaccine booster shots, breakthrough cases πŸ’₯πŸ‘©πŸ‘©πŸ’₯

KOCO 5 is keeping you updated on the COVID-19 pandemic in Oklahoma. Keep checking this story for updates on vaccination rates, latest data updates of new cases and breakthrough cases, along with local and national headlines. Confirmed COVID-19 Cases in Oklahoma650,004 total cumulative cases; 11,534 deaths (provisional death count provided by the CDC)Active Cases5,4497-Day Rolling Average Of Daily New Cases665Recent 3-Day Average Hospitalizations424Pediatric Hospitalizations16 Who is Eligible to Get Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shot>> How to get the COVID-19 vaccine in Oklahoma The Food and Drug Administration authorized and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention approved an emergency use authorization for the administration of a single booster dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for certain eligible individuals on Sept. 23.The emergency use authorization currently only applies to the Pfizer vaccine, OSDH officials said. The CDC and FDA continue to evaluate data to make a recommendation on booster doses of the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines.The CDC recommends the following individuals receive a Pfizer booster shot:People 65 years and older and residents in long-term care settings should receive a booster shot.People aged 50–64 years with underlying medical conditions should receive a booster shot.People aged 18–49 years with underlying medical conditions may receive a booster shot based on their individual benefits and risks.People aged 18-64 years who are at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission because of occupational or institutional settings may receive a booster shot based on their individual benefits and risks.>> More on this: What you need to know about getting the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine booster dose Tracking Vaccine Breakthrough Cases (This will be updated weekly on Wednesdays as the OSDH releases the latest data. The OSDH’s weekly report has not included these numbers since Oct. 13)Number of Oklahomans Vaccinated:Number of Americans Vaccinated:>> How to get the COVID-19 vaccine in Oklahoma>> Get the Facts on the Vax: Oklahoma doctors answer your questions about COVID-19 vaccineLatest Local, National Headlines (As of Monday, Nov. 8, 2021) Federal officials urge schools to provide COVID-19 shots, info for kids and parentsMandates for vaccination or testing at larger companies to take effect Jan. 4 Cherokee Nation offering pediatric COVID-19 vaccine to children ages 5-11 Oklahoma health leaders ready after CDC recommended Pfizer vaccine for children5- to 11-year-olds can now get a COVID-19 vaccine in the US Gov. Kevin Stitt requests COVID-19 vaccine mandate suspension for Oklahoma guardsmen What are the symptoms of COVID-19/coronavirus?Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, these are the symptoms you should watch out for:Fever or chillsCoughShortness of breath or difficulty breathingFatigueMuscle or body achesHeadacheNew loss of taste or smellSore throatCongestion or runny noseNausea or vomitingDiarrheaThis list does not include all possible symptoms. CDC will continue to update this list as they learn more about the virus.Should I get tested for COVID-19? Where can I get a test in Oklahoma?The CDC recommends that you should consider taking a COVID-19 test if you:have symptoms of COVID-19.have had close contact (within 6 feet for a total of 15 minutes or more) with someone with confirmed COVID-19.have been asked or referred to get testing by their healthcare provider, local/external icon or state ​health department.>> Click here for a list of testing locations across OklahomaEmergency care for COVID-19 symptomsThe CDC says to look for emergency warning signs for coronavirus. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:Trouble breathingPersistent pain or pressure in the chestNew confusionInability to wake or stay awakeBluish lips or faceThis list is not all possible symptoms. Call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you. Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.Who is most at risk for coronavirus?Anyone can have mild to severe symptoms of COVID-19, according to the CDC.Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from the virus.Flu or COVID-19. What’s the difference between them?Because some of the symptoms of flu and COVID-19 are similar, it may be hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone. That’s when testing may be needed to help confirm a diagnosis.There are some key differences between flu and COVID-19. The CDC says it seems COVID-19 spreads more easily than flu and causes more serious illnesses in some people. It can also take longer before people show symptoms of COVID-19 and people can be contagious for a longer period of time than the flu. What does it mean to be “fully vaccinated?”According to the CDC, people are considered fully vaccinated two weeks after their second dose in a two-dose series, such as Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, or two weeks after a single-dose vaccine, such as Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine. If you do not meet those requirements, regardless of age, you are not fully vaccinated.>> Keep your COVID-19 vaccine card safe with a plastic holder or a protective sleeveI’m fully vaccinated. What can I do?You can resume activities that you did prior to the pandemic, the CDC says. You no longer need to wear a mask or stay 6 feet apart, except where required by federal, state, local, tribal, or territorial laws, rules and regulations, including local businesses and workplace guidance.Do I need to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test or vaccination prior to travel?If you choose to travel in the United States, you do not need to get tested before or after travel. You do not need to self-quarantine after travel.If traveling internationally, pay close attention to the situation at your international destination before traveling outside the United States. You do not need to get tested before leaving the United States unless your destination requires it.You do need to show a negative test or documentation of recovery from COVID-19 before boarding an international flight to the United States.The CDC recommends you still get tested 3-5 days after international travel, but you do not need to self-quarantine after arriving in the United States.I’m not vaccinated. What activities should I and should I not partake in?Outdoor Activities:Safest: Walk, run, wheelchair roll, or bike outdoors with members of your household. Attend a small, outdoor gathering with fully vaccinated family and friends. While masked, attend a small, outdoor gathering with fully vaccinated and unvaccinated people, particularly in areas of substantial to high transmission.Less Safe: While masked, dine at an outdoor restaurant with friends from multiple households.Least Safe: While masked, attend a crowded, outdoor event, like a live performance, parade, or sports event.Indoor Activities:Less Safe: While masked, visit a barber or hair salon, go to an uncrowded, indoor shopping center or museum, attend a small, indoor gathering of fully vaccinated and unvaccinated people from multiple households.Least Safe: While masked, go to an indoor movie theater, attend a full-capacity worship service, sing in an indoor choir, eat at an indoor restaurant or bar, participate in an indoor, high-intensity exercise class.What don’t we know yet about the COVID-19 vaccine?The CDC says they are still unsure how effective the vaccines are against variants of the virus that causes COVID-19. Early data indicates that vaccines may work against some variants, but are less effective against others. They are also still learning how well the vaccines protect people with weakened immune systems, including people who take immunosuppressive medications. The CDC is also unsure how long the COVID-19 vaccines can protect people.Helpful ResourcesCenters for Disease Control and PreventionOklahoma State Department of Health COVID-19 responseOklahoma City-County Health DepartmentCleveland County Health DepartmentCanadian County Health DepartmentLogan County Health DepartmentTulsa Health DepartmentFull list of county health departments across OklahomaHow to clean your phone

KOCO 5 is keeping you updated on the COVID-19 pandemic in Oklahoma. Keep checking this story for updates on vaccination rates, latest data updates of new cases and breakthrough cases, along with local and national headlines.

[Complete coronavirus coverage | Oklahoma State Department of Health coronavirus page]

Confirmed COVID-19 Cases in Oklahoma

650,004 total cumulative cases; 11,534 deaths (provisional death count provided by the CDC)

Active Cases

5,449

7-Day Rolling Average Of Daily New Cases

665

Recent 3-Day Average Hospitalizations

424

Pediatric Hospitalizations

16


Who is Eligible to Get Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shot

>> How to get the COVID-19 vaccine in Oklahoma

The Food and Drug Administration authorized and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention approved an emergency use authorization for the administration of a single booster dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for certain eligible individuals on Sept. 23.

The emergency use authorization currently only applies to the Pfizer vaccine, OSDH officials said. The CDC and FDA continue to evaluate data to make a recommendation on booster doses of the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines.

The CDC recommends the following individuals receive a Pfizer booster shot:

  • People 65 years and older and residents in long-term care settings should receive a booster shot.
  • People aged 50–64 years with underlying medical conditions should receive a booster shot.
  • People aged 18–49 years with underlying medical conditions may receive a booster shot based on their individual benefits and risks.
  • People aged 18-64 years who are at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission because of occupational or institutional settings may receive a booster shot based on their individual benefits and risks.

>> More on this: What you need to know about getting the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine booster dose


Tracking Vaccine Breakthrough Cases

(This will be updated weekly on Wednesdays as the OSDH releases the latest data. The OSDH’s weekly report has not included these numbers since Oct. 13)


Number of Oklahomans Vaccinated:

Number of Americans Vaccinated:

>> How to get the COVID-19 vaccine in Oklahoma

>> Get the Facts on the Vax: Oklahoma doctors answer your questions about COVID-19 vaccine


Latest Local, National Headlines (As of Monday, Nov. 8, 2021)

What are the symptoms of COVID-19/coronavirus?

Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, these are the symptoms you should watch out for:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

This list does not include all possible symptoms. CDC will continue to update this list as they learn more about the virus.

Should I get tested for COVID-19? Where can I get a test in Oklahoma?

The CDC recommends that you should consider taking a COVID-19 test if you:

  • have symptoms of COVID-19.
  • have had close contact (within 6 feet for a total of 15 minutes or more) with someone with confirmed COVID-19.
  • have been asked or referred to get testing by their healthcare provider, local/external icon or state ​health department.

>> Click here for a list of testing locations across Oklahoma

Emergency care for COVID-19 symptoms

The CDC says to look for emergency warning signs for coronavirus. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Bluish lips or face

This list is not all possible symptoms. Call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you. Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

Who is most at risk for coronavirus?

Anyone can have mild to severe symptoms of COVID-19, according to the CDC.

Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from the virus.

Flu or COVID-19. What’s the difference between them?

Because some of the symptoms of flu and COVID-19 are similar, it may be hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone. That’s when testing may be needed to help confirm a diagnosis.

There are some key differences between flu and COVID-19. The CDC says it seems COVID-19 spreads more easily than flu and causes more serious illnesses in some people. It can also take longer before people show symptoms of COVID-19 and people can be contagious for a longer period of time than the flu.

What does it mean to be “fully vaccinated?”

According to the CDC, people are considered fully vaccinated two weeks after their second dose in a two-dose series, such as Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, or two weeks after a single-dose vaccine, such as Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine. If you do not meet those requirements, regardless of age, you are not fully vaccinated.

>> Keep your COVID-19 vaccine card safe with a plastic holder or a protective sleeve

I’m fully vaccinated. What can I do?

You can resume activities that you did prior to the pandemic, the CDC says. You no longer need to wear a mask or stay 6 feet apart, except where required by federal, state, local, tribal, or territorial laws, rules and regulations, including local businesses and workplace guidance.

Do I need to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test or vaccination prior to travel?

If you choose to travel in the United States, you do not need to get tested before or after travel. You do not need to self-quarantine after travel.

If traveling internationally, pay close attention to the situation at your international destination before traveling outside the United States. You do not need to get tested before leaving the United States unless your destination requires it.

You do need to show a negative test or documentation of recovery from COVID-19 before boarding an international flight to the United States.

The CDC recommends you still get tested 3-5 days after international travel, but you do not need to self-quarantine after arriving in the United States.

I’m not vaccinated. What activities should I and should I not partake in?

Outdoor Activities:

Safest: Walk, run, wheelchair roll, or bike outdoors with members of your household. Attend a small, outdoor gathering with fully vaccinated family and friends. While masked, attend a small, outdoor gathering with fully vaccinated and unvaccinated people, particularly in areas of substantial to high transmission.

Less Safe: While masked, dine at an outdoor restaurant with friends from multiple households.

Least Safe: While masked, attend a crowded, outdoor event, like a live performance, parade, or sports event.

Indoor Activities:

Less Safe: While masked, visit a barber or hair salon, go to an uncrowded, indoor shopping center or museum, attend a small, indoor gathering of fully vaccinated and unvaccinated people from multiple households.

Least Safe: While masked, go to an indoor movie theater, attend a full-capacity worship service, sing in an indoor choir, eat at an indoor restaurant or bar, participate in an indoor, high-intensity exercise class.

What don’t we know yet about the COVID-19 vaccine?

The CDC says they are still unsure how effective the vaccines are against variants of the virus that causes COVID-19. Early data indicates that vaccines may work against some variants, but are less effective against others. They are also still learning how well the vaccines protect people with weakened immune systems, including people who take immunosuppressive medications. The CDC is also unsure how long the COVID-19 vaccines can protect people.

Helpful Resources

COVID-19 in Oklahoma: New cases, deaths, vaccine booster shots, breakthrough cases

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